Speaking from „Horse-Meat“ – let´s talk about TRANSPORT of HORSES TO SLAUGHTER-HOUSES in EUROPE


spiritandanimal.wordpress.com

Cover of "Slaughterhouse: The Shocking St... Cover via Amazon

an american major slaughterhouse (a so called ... an american major slaughterhouse (a so called packinghouse), around 1903 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

http://youtu.be/ZPz-4-VdF1s  WARNING WARNING WARNING WARNING WARNING

I often quoted Gail Eisnitz` book: SLAUGHTERHOUSE in my own book (www.schweingehabt.wordpress.com/) Once she named Slaughterhouses the

DARKEST PLACES OF UNIVERSUM.

And I add: Transport of horses (cattles, pigs and all the other animals) to Slaughterhouses – a Tour to the Darkest Places of Universum – watch Video! And, by the way, Gail becomes a friend!

Inspectors of armed forces control meat handli... Inspectors of armed forces control meat handling in the slaughterhouse of “Produktion” in Hamburg-Hamm, Wendenstraße. Militärinspektoren kontrollieren die Fleischverarbeitung im Schlachthof der Genossenschaft „Produktion“, Wendenstraße in Hamburg-Hamm. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Ursprünglichen Post anzeigen 51 weitere Wörter

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Facts | Factory Farm Map


Facts | Factory Farm Map

Find out how factory farms affect all of us:

  • Farms & Communities

    Huge meat companies have steadily driven down the prices farmers receive for the livestock they raise, forcing farms to “get big or get out.” Small farms have been replaced by factory farms that pollute nearby air and water, undermine rural economies, and reduce the quality of life for neighbors.

    Protect Our Food: Act for a Fair Farm BillClose

  • Consumers

    The meat industry tells consumers that factory farms are modern, efficient, and produce cheap food. But factory farms leave consumers with fewer choices and make them pay more for meat, poultry and dairy products, while farmers get paid less.

    Find out how to buy food that doesn’t come from factory farmsClose

  • Food Safety

    Factory farms increase the risk of pathogens like E. coli and Salmonella that cause foodborne illness in people. And bad practices on even a few factory farms can end up on everyone’s plate.

    Stop the superbugs! End the overuse of antibiotics on factory farmsClose

  • Health

    Foodborne illness isn’t the only health threat from factory farms. Overuse of antibiotics can fuel the growth of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, the use of arsenic and growth hormones can increase the risk of cancer in people, and crowded conditions can be a breeding ground for disease.

    Find out how to buy food that doesn’t come from factory farmsClose

  • Animal Welfare

    Chickens and hogs on factory farms have no access to the outdoors, fresh air or natural light. Cattle on factory farms do not graze on pasture. And the pressure put on animals to grow quicker and produce more meat or milk results in frequent health problems.

    Close

Facts

United States

  • There are 4 factory-farmed chickens for every single American.
  • U.S. hog factory farms added 4,600 hogs every day between 1997 and 2007.
  • U.S. factory-farm dairies added nearly 650 cows every day between 1997 and 2007.
  • Between 1997 and 2007, U.S. factory farms added 5,800 broiler chickens every hour.

More United States facts

Alabama

  • There are 23 times more chickens than people in Alabama.
  • The 107.6 million broiler chickens, 165,000 hogs, 1.6 million egg-laying hens, and other livestock on factory farms in Alabama produce as much untreated manure as 40 million people — nearly 9 times the population of Alabama.

Arizona

  • There are 48 times more chickens than people in Arkansas.
  • The average Arizona factory-farm dairy has nearly 2,700 cows.
  • The more than 93,000 dairy cows on factory-farm dairies in Maricopa County, Arizona produce as much untreated manure as the sewage from the New York City metro area.
  • The 180,500 dairy cows, 366,600 beef cattle, 614,000 egg-laying hens, and 5,100 hogs on factory farms in Arizona produce as much untreated manure as 77 million people — 11 times the population of Arizona.

Arkansas

  • The Government Accountability Office reported that Benton and Washington counties in Arkansas produced 942 million pounds of manure in 2002.
  • The more than 16 million broiler chickens on factory farms in Benton County, Arkansas produce as much untreated manure as the sewage from the Atlanta metro area.
  • The more than 14 million broiler chickens on factory farms in Washington County, Arkansas produce as much untreated manure as the sewage from the Boston metro area.
  • The 133.8 million broiler chickens, 3.6 million egg-laying hens, 244,700 hogs, 3,800 beef cattle, and nearly 1,500 dairy cows on factory farms in Arkansas produce as much untreated manure as 51 million people — nearly 18 times the population of Arkansas.

More Arkansas facts

California

  • The average industrial feedlot in California had more than 18,700 beef cattle.
  • The nearly 240,000 dairy cows on factory-farm dairies in Merced County, California produce ten times more waste than the sewage from the Atlanta metro area.
  • The 155,000 dairy cows on factory-farmed dairies in Kings County, California produce twice as much untreated manure as the sewage from the New York City metro area.
  • The 399,000 beef cattle on industrial feedlots in Imperial County, California produce twice as much untreated manure as the sewage from the New York City metro area.

More California facts

Colorado

  • There is one factory farmed hog for every 5 people in Colorado.
  • There is one beef cattle on an industrial feedlot for every 5 people in Colorado.
  • The average Colorado hog factory farm has more than 30,800 hogs — about six times larger than the national average.
  • The more than 181,000 beef cattle on industrial feedlots in Yuma County, Colorado produce as much untreated manure as the sewage from the Los Angeles and Atlanta metro areas combined.

More Colorado facts

Delaware

  • There are 19 times more chickens on factory farms than people in Delaware.
  • The more than 14 million broiler chickens on factory farms in Sussex County, Delaware produce as much untreated manure as the sewage from the Boston metro area.

Florida

  • The size of average Florida egg factory farms nearly tripled to 1.6 million hens between 1997 and 2007.
  • In 2009, the EPA issued an administrative order against a Sarasota County dairy for improperly disposing of dead cows above ground. The dairy had been sued in 2003 for disposing of manure without a permit.

Georgia

  • There are 22 times more chickens on factory farms than people in Georgia.
  • The more than 10.7 million broiler chickens on factory farms in Gilmer County, Georgia produce as much untreated manure as the sewage from the Seattle metro area.
  • The more than 17.5 million broiler chickens on factory farms in Franklin County, Georgia produce as much untreated manure as the sewage from the Philadelphia metro area.
  • The nearly 205 million broiler chickens, 9 million egg-laying hens, 235,000 hogs, and 35,000 dairy cows on factory farms in Georgia produce as much untreated manure as 85 million people — nearly 9 times the population of Georgia.

Idaho

  • The average Idaho factory-farm dairy has more than 2,100 cows.
  • There is one factory farmed dairy cow for every three people in Idaho.
  • There is one beef cattle on an industrial feedlot for every 6 people in Idaho.
  • The more than 135,000 dairy cows on factory-farm dairies in Gooding County, Idaho produce as much untreated manure as the sewage output from the New York City and Chicago metro areas combined.

More Idaho facts

Illinois

  • There is one factory farmed hog for every three people in Illinois.
  • The number of factory farmed hogs in Illinois grew by 22 percent to 3.9 million between 1997 and 2007.
  • The size of average Illinois egg factory farms nearly doubled to nearly 821,000 million hens between 1997 and 2007.
  • In 2009, an Iroquois County hog operation manure spill tainted 19-miles of a local stream, killing fish for several days, including the native northern pike.

More Illinois facts

Indiana

  • There are 6 times as many hogs on factory farms as people in Iowa.
  • There are only twice as many people as factory farmed hogs in Indiana.
  • The number of factory farmed hogs in Indiana grew by 18 percent to 3.3 million between 1997 and 2007.
  • The more than 6 million egg-laying hens on factory farms in Adams County, Indiana produce as much untreated manure as the sewage from the San Diego metro area.

More Indiana facts

Iowa

  • There are 18 times more chickens on factory farms than people in Iowa.
  • The number of factory farmed hogs in Iowa grew 75 percent to 17.9 million between 1997 and 2007.
  • The size of average Iowa egg factory farms nearly tripled to nearly 1.3 million hens between 1997 and 2007.
  • In 2008, a leaky hose on a Blairstown, Iowa dairy allowed 5,000 gallons of manure to discharge to a local waterway.

More Iowa facts

Kansas

  • The average Kansas hog factory farm has 10,000 pigs.
  • The average Kansas factory-farm dairy has nearly 3,600 cows.
  • There are only twice as many people as factory farmed hogs in Kansas.
  • Kansas nearly has more beef cattle on industrial feedlots (2.6 million) than people (2.8 million).

More Kansas facts

Kentucky

  • There are 11 times more chickens on factory farms than people in Kentucky.
  • In 2003, a federal judge in Kentucky found that because Tyson Foods exercises so much control over its contract poultry growers, it too was responsible for the air pollution caused by these operations.

Louisiana

  • There are six times more chickens on factory farms than people in Louisiana.

Maine

  • In 2008, a 4-mile cow manure spill was left on a Maine state highway.

Maryland

  • There are six times more chickens on factory farms than people in Maryland.
  • Perdue’s poultry operations in the Chesapeake Bay produce so much more waste than the region can handle that the manure has to be trucked out of the state.
  • Livestock manure from the watersheds that feed the Chesapeake Bay are the source of about one-fourth of the pollution that causes oxygen-depleted dead zones in the Chesapeake.
  • In 2009, a 1,000-cow Frederick County, Maryland dairy operation reimbursed the county and a local city $254,900 for emergency water supplies, testing and other costs after a 576,000 gallon manure spill in 2008 polluted the town’s water supply, which had to be shut off for two months.

More Maryland facts

Michigan

  • The size of average Michigan egg factory farms nearly tripled to more than 875,000 hens between 1997 and 2007.
  • In 2009, as many as 200,000 fish were killed in a 12-mile length of the Black River in Sanilac County, Michigan after dairy manure was improperly spread on fields.
  • The more than 3.5 million egg-laying hens on factory farms in Allegan County, Michigan produce as much untreated manure as the sewage from the Austin, Texas metro area.
  • In 2007, the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality sued the 6,600-head Ingham County Vreba-Hoff Dairy for failing to comply with state water quality laws and violating a 2005 consent judgment.

More Michigan facts

Minnesota

  • There are 40% more factory farmed hogs (7.1 million) than people (5.3 million) in Minnesota.
  • The number of factory farmed hogs in Minnesota grew 70 percent to 7.1 million between 1997 and 2002.
  • The more than 679,000 hogs on factory farms in McLeod County, Minnesota produce twice as much untreated manure as the sewage from the Houston metro area.
  • The 7 million hogs, nearly 290,000 beef cattle, 91,000 dairy cows, 9 million egg-laying hens, and 3 million broiler chickens on factory farms in Minnesota produce as much untreated manure as 179 million people — more than half the U.S. population.

Mississippi

  • There are 38 times more chickens on factory farms than people in Mississippi.
  • The 110 million broiler chickens, 1.8 million egg-laying hens, 326,600 hogs and 3,500 dairy cows on factory farms in Mississippi produce as much untreated manure as 44 million people — 15 times the population of Mississippi.

Missouri

  • There are only twice as many people as factory farmed hogs in Missouri.
  • There are 8 times more chickens on factory farms than people in Missouri.
  • The size of average Missouri egg factory farms doubled to nearly 1.4 million hens between 1997 and 2007.
  • Premium Standard Farms industrial hog facilities were three of the top five sources of odor complaints in Missouri between 2002 and 2006.

More Missouri facts

Nebraska

  • There are 40% more cattle on feedlots (2.5 million) than people (1.8 million) in Nebraska.
  • There are 60% more factory farmed hogs (2.9 million) than people (1.8 million) in Nebraska.
  • The nearly 254,000 beef cattle on industrial feedlots in Cuming County, Nebraska produce as much untreated manure as the sewage from the New York City and Miami metro areas combined.
  • The more than 2.5 million beef cattle, 2.8 million hogs, 10 million egg-laying hens, nearly 26,700 dairy cows, and 168,000 broiler chickens on factory farms in Nebraska produce as much untreated manure as 313 million people — more than the entire U.S. population.

New Mexico

  • The average New Mexico factory-farm dairy has nearly 2,400 cows.
  • There is one factory farmed dairy cow for every six people in New Mexico.
  • Along Interstate 10 southeast of Las Cruces, New Mexico, there are 30,000 dairy cows on 11 back-to-back dairies.
  • The 85,000 dairy cows on factory-farm dairies in Chaves County, New Mexico produce as much untreated manure as the sewage output from the Los Angeles and Philadelphia metro areas combined.

More New Mexico facts

New York

  • The nearly 213,000 dairy cows on factory-farm dairies in New York produce as much untreated manure as 47 million people — two and a half times the population of New York.
  • In 2009, a dairy manure spill in upstate New York spilled into a tributary of the St. Lawrence River. Workers at a 6,000-head dairy spread manure to frozen fields, which pooled and leaked into the river.

North Carolina

  • There are nine times more chickens on factory farms than people in North Carolina.
  • There are more factory farmed hogs (10.1 million) than people (9.4 million) in North Carolina.
  • The more than 2.2 million hogs on factory farms in Duplin County, North Carolina produce twice as much untreated manure as the sewage from the New York City metro area.
  • The nearly 812,000 hogs on factory farms in Bladen County, North Carolina produce as much untreated manure as the sewage from the Chicago and Atlanta metro areas combined.

More North Carolina facts

North Dakota

  • There is one factory farmed hog for every four people in North Dakota.

Ohio

  • In 2009, a Fulton County dairy manure sprayer became stuck, dispersing manure that entered the Little Bear Creek.
  • In 2009, a line break on a Miami County hog farm spilled manure and affected 4.5 miles of the Canyon Run Creek and Stillwater River, killing 3,000 fish.
  • In 2008, the Ohio Department of Natural Resources investigated a manure spill that contaminated 2 miles of a tributary of the Middle Creek and caused a fish kill.
  • The nearly 4.5 million egg-laying hens on factory farms in Darke County, Ohio produce as much untreated manure as the sewage from the entire Cincinnati metro area.

More Ohio facts

Oklahoma

  • The average Oklahoma hog factory farm has 24,800 pigs.
  • The average Oklahoma factory-farm dairy has more than 2,400 cows.
  • The average industrial feedlot in Oklahoma has nearly 13,300 beef cattle.
  • There are seven times more chickens on factory farms than people in Oklahoma.

More Oklahoma facts

Oregon

  • In 2009, an Oregon feedlot agreed to pay an $8,000 penalty to settle discharge violations for allowing manure to flow into a Snake River tributary.
  • Threemile Canyon Farms in Boardman, Oregon, is the largest dairy operation in the state with tens of thousands cows, which release more than 15,000 pounds of ammonia into the air every single day.

Pennsylvania

  • The more than 3.7 million egg-laying hens on factory farms in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania produce as much untreated manure as the sewage from the Columbus, Ohio metro area.
  • The nearly 1 million hogs, 54,600 dairy cows, 25 million chickens and 35,000 beef cattle produce as much untreated manure as 43 million people — three and a half times the population of Pennsylvania.
  • In 2010, Fulton County dairy operators agreed to pay a $12,920 fine and shut down their farm after tens of thousands of gallons of manure spilled into a tributary of the Licking Creek and Potomac River and killed 650 fish.

South Carolina

  • There are 8 times more chickens on factory farms than people in South Carolina.

South Dakota

  • There are nearly two factory farmed hogs for every person in South Dakota.
  • There is one beef cattle on an industrial feedlot for every 2 people in South Dakota.
  • The 342,000 beef cattle, 1.4 million hogs, 45,000 dairy cows, and 2.8 million egg-laying hens on factory farms in South Dakota produce as much untreated manure as 69 million people — 85 times the population of South Dakota.

Texas

  • The average Texas hog factory farm has 100,000 hogs.
  • The average industrial feedlot in Texas has more than 20,500 beef cattle.
  • The nearly 14 million broiler chickens on factory farms in Nacogdoches County, Texas produce as much untreated manure as the sewage from the Detroit metro area.
  • The more than 20 million broiler chickens on factory farms in Shelby County, Texas produce as much untreated manure as the sewage from the Dallas-Fort Worth metro area.

More Texas facts

Utah

  • The average Utah hog factory farm has nearly 40,000 pigs.
  • There is one factory farmed hog for every four people in Utah.

Vermont

  • In 2008, the Vermont Agency of Natural Resources fined two northwestern Vermont farmers for excessive manure spreading on local field that ran off into Lake Champlain.

Virginia

  • In 2010, the EPA ordered a dairy and turkey farm from discharging nitrogen and phosphorus laden manure into a tributary of the Shenandoah River.
  • In 2010, the EPA ordered a 100,000 broiler chicken operation to stop discharging pollutants from large piles of uncovered chicken manure that were leaching nitrogen and phosphorus into a tributary of the Shenandoah River.
  • In 2010, the EPA ordered a 100,000 broiler chicken operation in Virginia to stop discharging pollutants from large piles of uncovered chicken manure that were leaching nitrogen and phosphorus into a tributary of the Shenandoah River.

Washington

  • The average industrial feedlot in Washington has more than 12,100 beef cattle.
  • In 2010, a manure lagoon on a 750-cow dairy collapsed, spilling 12 million gallons of manure onto fields that leaked into the Snohimish River.
  • The 86,000 dairy cows on factory-farm dairies in Yakima County, Washington produce as much untreated manure as the sewage output from the New York City metro area.
  • In 2008, a Mt. Vernon, Washington dairy agreed to pay an $8,000 penalty to settle alleged Clean Water Act violations for manure discharges that leaked from a barn into a tributary that leads to the Puget Sound.

More Washington facts

West Virginia

  • There are six times more chickens on factory farms than people in West Virginia.

Wisconsin

  • In 2008, a 600-heifer Rockland, Wisconsin farm was ordered to pay $28,000 for a manure discharge that killed 225 trout in a nearby creek and many more fish as far as 9 miles downstream.
  • Some Wisconsin mega-dairies have operated without necessary permits and many never receive an onsite inspection — the state’s goal is to visit once every 5 years but admits it does not meet that goal.
  • Between 2003 and the end of 2010, Wisconsin will have permitted 200 mega-dairies to open or expand but has never turned down a permit application or revoked a permit, even after repeated environmental violations.
  • The 257,000 dairy cows, nearly 270,000 hogs, 40,000 beef cattle, 4.9 million broiler chickens, and 3.6 million egg-laying hens on factory farms in Wisconsin produce as much untreated manure as 69 million people — 12 times the population of Wisconsin.

More Wisconsin facts

Wyoming

  • The average Wyoming hog factory farm has nearly 34,000 pigs.

Mother Jones: Are We Becoming China’s Factory Farm?US hog operations are feeding more than a billion people’s growing appetite for pork.


Mother Jones

Are We Becoming China’s Factory Farm?

US hog operations are feeding more than a billion people’s growing appetite for pork.

Social Title:
Are we becoming China’s factory farm?
pigs on conveyor belt

Illustration: Michael Klein

China is in the midst of a love affair with pork. Its consumption of the stuff has nearly doubled since 1993 and just keeps rising. The Chinese currently eat 88 pounds per capita each year—far more than Americans‘ relatively measly 60 pounds. To meet the growing demand, China’s hog farms have grown and multiplied, and more than half of the globe’s pigs are now raised there. But even so, its production can’t keep up with the pork craze.

So where is China looking to supply its demand for chops, ribs, loins, butts, and bellies? Not Southeast Asia or Africa—more like Iowa and North Carolina. US pork exports to China surged from about 57,000 metric tons in 2003 to more than 430,000 metric tons in 2012, about a fifth of all such exports. And that was before a Chinese company announced its intention to buy US pork giant Smithfield Foods in 2013. The way things are going, the United States is poised to become China’s very own factory hog farm. Here are a few reasons why:

➊ It’s now cheaper to produce pork in the US than in China. You read that right: Our meat industry churns out hogs for about $0.57 per pound, according to the US Department of Agriculture, versus $0.68 per pound in China’s new, factory-scale hog farms. The main difference is feed costs. US pig producers spend about 25 percent less on feed than their Chinese counterparts, the USDA found, because the „United States has more abundant land, water, and grain resources.“

âž‹Americans are not as fond of „the other white meat“ as we once were. You wouldn’t know it from the menus in trendy restaurants, but US consumers‘ appetite for pork hit a peak in 1999 and has declined ever since. Yet industry, beholden to shareholders demanding growth, keeps churning out more. According to its latest projections, the USDA expects US pork exports to rise by another 0.9 metric tons by 2022—a 33 percent jump from 2012 levels.

➌ Much of China’s arable land is polluted. Fully 40 percent has been degraded by erosion, salinization, or acidification—and nearly 20 percent is tainted by industrial effluent, sewage, excessive farm chemicals, or mining runoff. The pollution makes soil less productive, and dangerous elements like cadmium have turned up in rice crops.

➍ Chinese rivers have been vanishing since the 1990s as demand from farms and factories has helped suck them dry. Of the ones that remain, 75 percent are severely polluted, and more than a third of those are so toxic they can’t be used to irrigate farms, according to a 2008 report by the Chinese government. According to the World Bank, China’s average annual water resources are less than 2,200 cubic meters per capita. The United States, by contrast, boasts almost 9,400 cubic meters of water per person.

➎ Chinese consumers are losing trust in the nation’s food supply—and will pay for alternatives. A spate of food-related scandals over the past half decade has made food safety the Chinese public’s No. 1 concern, a 2013 study from Shanghai Jiao Tong University found. Judith Shapiro, author of the 2012 book China’s Environmental Challenges and director of the Natural Resources and Sustainable Development program at American University, says she expects Smithfield pork to command „quite a premium“ in China, because it’s perceived as safer and better than the domestic stuff. Already, „US pork is particularly popular and commands premium prices, as it is viewed as higher quality due to our strict food safety laws,“ a Bloomberg Businessweek columnist reported last July.

But what’s good for pork exporters may not be good for the United States: More mass-produced pork also means more pollution to air and water from toxic manure, more dangerous and low-wage work, and more antibiotic-resistant pathogens. And that’s just the beginning. In addition to ramping up foreign meat purchases, China is also rapidly transforming its domestic meat industry along the US industrial model—and importing enormous amounts of feed to do so. The Chinese and their hogs, chickens, and cows gobble up a jaw-dropping 60 percent of the global trade in soybeans, and the government may soon also ramp up corn imports—because while Beijing currently limits foreign corn purchases, meat producers are clamoring for more. And where does a third of the globe’s corn come from? You guessed it: The good old USA.

On each day of October 2013 an average of 336.129 pigs were slaughtered – 4 per second)


Brutality to animals is cruelty to mankind – it is only the difference in the victim.“

– Alphonse de Lamartine, 1847

On November 21, 2013, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) released these data.

On each day of October, 2013, an average of: 336,129 pigs were slaughtered (4 per second)

93,548 cows were slaughtered (1 per second)

6,712 sheep were slaughtered (one every 12 seconds)

2,241 calves were slaughtered (one every 30 seconds)

TOTAL: This averages out to 307 brutal killings for every minute of every hour of every day

during October of 2013.

Imagine three things.

1) The never-ending assembly line

s 2) Each animal dies by partial beheading with a sharp knife while still alive

3) The volume of blood

„I like children they are tasty .“ –

Albert Fish Final words before his January 16, 1936 execution.

Fish was a serial killer who was believed to have consumed children in every state.

He was also known as The Brooklyn Vampire, the Werewolf of Wysteria the Moon Maniac,

and the Boogeyman.

Robert Cohen http://www.notmilk.com   cover1schweingehabt My book with a huge number of informations:

Schwein gehabt? – Gewalt auf unseren Tellern (Kindle  Edition) http://www.amazon.de/dp/B00BBDUBMC/ref=rdr_kindle_ext_tmb#_

WHO gave these workers the right to act in such way? Poor Animals…


http://youtu.be/tzrRmB40l00  

From Farm To Fridge „La vérité derrière la production de viande“

The utmost graphic video! 

 

 

„SCHWEIN GEHABT?“ wohl kaum: das kurze Leben eines Ferkels


 
 
 
189338_138900016175464_100001663987650_244637_8365274_s
 
Das kurze Leben von Ferkel 0146 © Björn LuxFarkel
 Ferkel 0146 hängt noch an der Nabelschnur. Anderthalb Kilo wiegt es nach der Geburt. Noch 118,5 Kilo bis zum Kotelett
Sechs Monate lang haben stern-Reporter ein Mastschwein begleitet. Von der Geburt im Stall bis zum Tod im Schlachthof – und darüber hinaus: Die Geschichte eines Schnitzels.Das Messer blitzt, die Schweine schrein,
Man muß sie halt benutzen,
Denn jeder denkt: Wozu das Schwein,
Wenn wir es nicht verputzen?
(Wilhelm Busch)
 

Blut tropft auf den Gitterrost. Der Bauer greift tief rein in die Sau – kommt da noch was? Auf einmal gucken kleine Klauen hervor, der Bauer zieht. „Hoffentlich bin ich nicht zu spät, das sah so blau aus“, sagt er.

Heute ist Ferkeltag im Stall von Bauer Pulvermann. Alle Sauen werden zur selben Zeit besamt, deshalb „ferkeln“ sie auch zur selben Zeit. Drei Monate, drei Wochen und drei Tage dauert die Schwangerschaft, „So’n Schwein funktioniert wie ein Uhrwerk“, sagt Dieter Pulvermann.

Die Sau schnauft schwer. Ein tiefes langes Grunzen, dann glitscht es aus ihr heraus, es quiekt. Das schleimige Ferkelkind verheddert sich in der Nabelschnur und fällt auf die Schnauze. Kurz öffnet es seine schwarzblauen Augen, dann stakst es los – da ist die Zitze. Schauer laufen ihm über den blassrosa Rücken, aber es saugt, kräftig und entschieden.

Die Geschichte eines Schnitzels

Das ist das Schwein, das wir sechs Monate begleiten werden, bis zum Tod. Wir nennen es nicht „Grunzi“, bestimmt nicht „Babe„. Keine Sentimentalitäten bitte. Denn dies ist die Geschichte eines Schnitzels. Geboren, um zu sterben. Produziert wie eine Alufelge oder eine Steckdose. Ein Gebrauchsgegenstand, und so liest sich auch sein Name: 0146. Das ist die Nummer des Stalls. 1,5 Kilo wiegt das Ferkel nach der Geburt. Noch 118,5 Kilo bis zum Schlachtgewicht. Ein Schweineleben.

Am ersten Morgen kommt der Ringelschwanz ab. Das Kupiereisen dampft, es riecht nach verbranntem Fleisch. Ferkel 0146 quietscht schrill und zappelt mit den Beinen. Anschließend werden die Eckzähne mit einer rotierenden Maschine abgeschliffen. Damit die Tiere sich nicht gegenseitig verletzen, sagt Valentina. Die Russlanddeutsche ist die einzige Angestellte auf dem Hof, zuständig für 4000 Tiere: 250 Säue und 3750 Mastschweine. Immer weniger Menschen, immer mehr Schweine. „Nur so bin ich konkurrenzfähig“, sagt Bauer Pulvermann. Als der diplomierte Agraringenieur den Hof 1990 von seinen Eltern übernahm, lebten dort 800 Schweine. …

….  Die Enkelinnen Julia und Lena, neun und elf Jahre alt, dazu eine Nachbarin, sind zum Abendessen eingeladen. Julia und Lena teilen sich ein Kotelett: „Das ist so riesig, das ist doch vom Dinosaurier, nicht vom Schwein.“ Die Mädchen kauen zufrieden. Im Kamin prasselt ein Feuer. Biedermeierstühle, Tafelsilber, gelbe Rosen, weißes Porzellan – Ferkel 0146 hat nicht stilvoll gelebt, aber es wird stilvoll verspeist.

http://www.stern.de/wirtschaft/news/maerkte/massentierhaltung-das-kurze-leben-von-ferkel-0146-643451.html BITTE VOLLSTÄNDIGEN ARTIKEL HIER DOWNLOADEN

 

MRSA: Glücksspiel mit der öffentlichen Gesundheit?


English: A ruptured MRSA cyst.
English: A ruptured MRSA cyst. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Gesendet:* 16:13 Mittwoch, 2.Januar
> 2013 *Betreff:* leserbrief
>
> MRSA – Glücksspiel mit der öffentliche Gesundheit
>
> Neue Zahlen aus Nord-Jytland zeigen, dass 20% der neuen Fälle von
> sogenannten Schweine-MRSA Infektion nicht von Schweinen, sondern von
> Menschen kommen.

Die Zahl steigt an, und wenn Aktion nicht getroffen
> wird, werden wir bald bis auf 40 oder 50% steigen. Durch das
> Befallen  der Bevölkerung mit MRSA wird die Landwirtschaft
> argumentieren können, dass es keinen Grund gäbe, die Situation in den
> Ställen lösen zu müssen.

Die Schweine-Industrie hat wohl die Behörden
> so stark manipuliert , dass die kurzfristigen Interessen der
> Landwirtschaft gewahrt werden, indem Antibiotika in großen Mengen zur Verfügung  steht, was natürlich auf
> Kosten des Gesundheitswesens und der öffentlichen Gesundheit
> geschieht.

Es ist schrecklich.

Das Schwein als Projektionsleinwand der Menschen


Karmelitenkreuzgang, Adler u. Schwein SW
Karmelitenkreuzgang, Adler u. Schwein SW (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Bundesarchiv Bild 183-15930-0004, Schweinemast...
Bundesarchiv Bild 183-15930-0004, Schweinemast ohne Kartoffel (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

SCHWEIN GEHABT?!

Geschrieben von: chengemagazin Am 22. November 2012 

 

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Dass das Schwein im Islam nicht sehr beliebt ist wissen die meisten Deutschen, da man es von mindestens Einem der4,5 Millionen, in Deutschland lebenden, Muslime schon einmal gehört hat. Immer wieder kommt es zu Konflikten zwischen islamischen Migranten und Deutschen, bei dem es unter anderem um den Verzehr von Schweinefleisch geht. Geht es bei diesem Konflikt wirklich nur um unterschiedliche Essgewohnheiten? Welchen symbolischen Stellenwert hat das Schwein in dieser Beziehung?

Das Verzehren vom Schwein ist in vielen Religionen verboten, da es oft als unrein bezeichnet wird und ein Zeichen von „Dreck“ ist. Sogar im Alten Testament ist von Unreinheit die Rede:„Du sollst nichts essen, was ein Gräuel ist. Dies aber sind die Tiere, die ihr essen dürft:…Das Schwein, das zwar gespaltene Klauen hat, aber nicht wiederkäut, soll euch darum unrein sein. Ihr Fleisch sollt ihr nicht essen, und ihr Aas sollt ihr nicht anrühren.“ (Deuteronomium 14:3-8) (- Siehe auch Levitikus 11-1-8). Es wird seit Jahrtausenden versucht, das Schweinefleischverbot mit der unreinen Lebensweise der Schweine zu begründen.

Daher ist es auch keine Seltenheit, dass muslimischen Schüler, ihre deutschen Mitschüler während der Pause, wenn die Butterbrote ausgepackt werden, als „Schweinefleischfresser“ beschimpfen. Diese Beleidigung ist sehr ausdrucksstark, da sie eine mächtige symbolische Bedeutung hat. Doch diese Art von Beleidigung ist nicht selten, ganz im Gegenteil: Kümmeltürke und Spaghettifresser sind bereits im Duden zu finden. Die Italiener nennen die Deutschen „Würstel con Krauti“ und mit ein wenig Phantasie könnte man die Griechen als Zaziki, die Franzosen als Froschfresser, die Spanier als Tortilla oder die Japaner als Sushi bezeichnen.

 

Anderen wiederum vergeht der Appetit.

Ich selbst wurde in Deutschland schon als Fladenbrotfresser bezeichnet, obwohl ich das „gute, alte“ deutsche Schwarzbrot bevorzuge. Allerdings habe ich beobachtet, dass die Deutschen im Urlaub in Marokko, Ägypten und der Türkei zu begeisterten „Fladenbrotfressern“ wurden und voller Stolz die Fotos herzeigen, auf denen sie ihr Buffet im Hotel oder im naheliegenden Restaurant zeigen. Meine Verärgerung über den „Fladenbrotfresser“ legte sich, als ich erstaunt feststellte, dass Fladenbrot in Europa zu den ältesten Speisen gehört, was sich in Schriften vom 3. Jahrtausend vor Christus belegen lässt.

In Deutschland werden despektierliche Gesten wie Mittelfinger, Vogelzeigen, ferne Beschimpfungen wie „Dumme Kuh“, „Wichser“, „Schlampe“, „alte Sau“, „dummes Schwein“ und „fieses Miststück“ mit bis zu zwei Jahren Haft oder mit einer Geldstrafe bis zu 2600 Euro geahndet werden. Spaghettifresser, Döner, Schweinefleischfresser, Kartoffel, Fladenbrotfresser oder Kümmeltürke dagegen sind als Schimpfworte an sich nicht strafbar, da kommt es auf den Zusammenhang an. In den Duden hat „Schweinefleischfresser“ bisher noch nicht Platz gefunden, Kümmelturke und Spaghettifresser dagegen sind fest etabliert.

Jetzt aber haben sich deutsche Politiker Gedanken gemacht und verlangen nun, deutschfeindliche Bezeichnungen wie Schweinefleischfresser oder deutsche Kartoffel zu bestrafen. Es wird sogar von Gesetzinitiative gesprochen, um solche Beschimpfungen zu verhindern. Wenn Deutsche und beispielsweise Türken sich von solchen Klischees lossprechen wollen, sollten sie am besten ganz auf Nahrung verzichten.

Leider begrenzt sich Deutschen- bzw. Ausländerfeindlichkeit nicht „nur“ auf Worte, sondern auch auf Taten, wie es am 28.04.12 in Neukölln zu sehen war: Zwei Unbekannte legten zwei abgetrennte Schweineköpfe in den Eingangsbereich einer Moschee ab. Diese Tat ist leider kein Einzelfall: Graz, Neukölln, Liers etc.

Auch in Haslach im Kinzigtal wurde ein abgetrennter Schweinekopf vor eine Moschee gelegt. Jedoch stufen die Ermittler diese Tat eher als „dummer Jungen-Streich“ ein, anstatt es als rassistisch motivierte Tat aufzufassen. Wie die Polizei zu dieser Ansicht kam, sagte sie allerdings aus „ermittlungstaktischen Gründen“ nicht und hüllen sich ins Schweigen. Dass „dumme Jungen“ aus purem Jux zum Schlachthof fahren um sich einen Schweinekopf zu kaufen, erscheint jedoch als unwahrscheinlich.

Etwas Ähnliches geschah in Frankreich, als es zu einer Demonstration gegen „Islamisierung“ kam. Eine Gruppe von Franzosen rief 2010 zu einer Freiluftparty im Pariser Einwandererviertel La Goutte-d’Or, was Goldtropfen heißt, es dort jedoch weniger harmonisch ist, als es der Name verspricht. „Saucisson et pinard“ – Wurst und Wein soll es geben – Schweinefleisch und Alkohol also. Mit dem Gelage wollen die Organisatoren ein Islamfeindliches und provokantes Stellung beziehen. Muslime werden als „Gegner unserer Weine und unserer Wurstwaren“ bezeichnet. Aus diesem Grund wählt die Rechtsextremistische Gruppe Bloc Identitairedas Wildschwein als Logo für ihre Gruppierung. Nun möchten sie eine neue Résistance einleiten, zunächst einmal mit Schwein und Wein.

Sie dürften Ausländer- als auch Deutschenfeindlichkeit als Schweinerei empfinden, daher gebe ich Ihnen nun einen abschließenden Tipp: Man ist überall fremd.

Rami Abu Harb

Das freundliche Hausschwein.

 

TIPPS UND LINKS:

http://www.tagesspiegel.de/berlin/polizei-justiz/neukoelln-abgetrennte-schweinekoepfe-vor-moschee-gelegt/6568832.html

http://de.statista.com/statistik/daten/studie/72321/umfrage/entwicklung-der-anzahl-der-muslime-in-deutschland-seit-1945/

http://www.wegzumislam.com/essen-a-trinken/253-grund-fuer-das-verbot-von-schweinefleisch

http://www.sueddeutsche.de/service/mein-deutschland-am-besten-ganz-auf-fleisch-verzichten-1.1028232

http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fladenbrot

http://www.sueddeutsche.de/politik/islamfeindlichkeit-in-frankreich-kreuzzug-mit-schwein-und-wein-1.959915

Chile Freirina Pig Plant Closes After Smell Protest


Chile Freirina pig plant closes after smell protests

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http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-20675617A pig processing plant in northern Chile that provoked months of protests by local people over the stench is to close indefinitely, its owner says.

In May, authorities ordered the plant closed and 500,000 pigs removed, as residents blocked access to the site.

Operations resumed recently, provoking renewed demonstrations.

Food firm Agrosuper said stricter environmental controls demanded by the government meant the plant was no longer economically viable.

Residents in the city of Freirina had long campaigned for the Agrosuper plant, one of Latin America’s biggest meat processing sites, to be shut, saying it produced a strong and unpleasant smell.

In May, the authorities declared a health alert in the area and temporarily closed the plant, after residents blocked the entrance and pigs began to die from lack of food and water.

Agrosuper was given six months to evacuate all the pigs, but protesters said it still had 270,000 animals there at the beginning of November.

However, the Chilean government issued a new decree allowing it to resume its activities last month, provoking further protests.

„The recent environmental rating substantially restricts our operation, leaving us a limited economic viability,“ a statement from Agrosuper’s board of directors said.

„This and the recent events, which we regret, have led the company to take this decision.“

Local people welcomed the announcement.

„This is a triumph for an organised community,“ Freirina Mayor Cesar Orellana told the Associated Press.

Agrosuper said it was sorry that the plant’s closure would mean job losses.