Speaking from „Horse-Meat“ – let´s talk about TRANSPORT of HORSES TO SLAUGHTER-HOUSES in EUROPE


spiritandanimal.wordpress.com

Cover of "Slaughterhouse: The Shocking St... Cover via Amazon

an american major slaughterhouse (a so called ... an american major slaughterhouse (a so called packinghouse), around 1903 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

http://youtu.be/ZPz-4-VdF1s  WARNING WARNING WARNING WARNING WARNING

I often quoted Gail Eisnitz` book: SLAUGHTERHOUSE in my own book (www.schweingehabt.wordpress.com/) Once she named Slaughterhouses the

DARKEST PLACES OF UNIVERSUM.

And I add: Transport of horses (cattles, pigs and all the other animals) to Slaughterhouses – a Tour to the Darkest Places of Universum – watch Video! And, by the way, Gail becomes a friend!

Inspectors of armed forces control meat handli... Inspectors of armed forces control meat handling in the slaughterhouse of “Produktion” in Hamburg-Hamm, Wendenstraße. Militärinspektoren kontrollieren die Fleischverarbeitung im Schlachthof der Genossenschaft „Produktion“, Wendenstraße in Hamburg-Hamm. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Ursprünglichen Post anzeigen 51 weitere Wörter

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Facts | Factory Farm Map


Facts | Factory Farm Map

Find out how factory farms affect all of us:

  • Farms & Communities

    Huge meat companies have steadily driven down the prices farmers receive for the livestock they raise, forcing farms to “get big or get out.” Small farms have been replaced by factory farms that pollute nearby air and water, undermine rural economies, and reduce the quality of life for neighbors.

    Protect Our Food: Act for a Fair Farm BillClose

  • Consumers

    The meat industry tells consumers that factory farms are modern, efficient, and produce cheap food. But factory farms leave consumers with fewer choices and make them pay more for meat, poultry and dairy products, while farmers get paid less.

    Find out how to buy food that doesn’t come from factory farmsClose

  • Food Safety

    Factory farms increase the risk of pathogens like E. coli and Salmonella that cause foodborne illness in people. And bad practices on even a few factory farms can end up on everyone’s plate.

    Stop the superbugs! End the overuse of antibiotics on factory farmsClose

  • Health

    Foodborne illness isn’t the only health threat from factory farms. Overuse of antibiotics can fuel the growth of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, the use of arsenic and growth hormones can increase the risk of cancer in people, and crowded conditions can be a breeding ground for disease.

    Find out how to buy food that doesn’t come from factory farmsClose

  • Animal Welfare

    Chickens and hogs on factory farms have no access to the outdoors, fresh air or natural light. Cattle on factory farms do not graze on pasture. And the pressure put on animals to grow quicker and produce more meat or milk results in frequent health problems.

    Close

Facts

United States

  • There are 4 factory-farmed chickens for every single American.
  • U.S. hog factory farms added 4,600 hogs every day between 1997 and 2007.
  • U.S. factory-farm dairies added nearly 650 cows every day between 1997 and 2007.
  • Between 1997 and 2007, U.S. factory farms added 5,800 broiler chickens every hour.

More United States facts

Alabama

  • There are 23 times more chickens than people in Alabama.
  • The 107.6 million broiler chickens, 165,000 hogs, 1.6 million egg-laying hens, and other livestock on factory farms in Alabama produce as much untreated manure as 40 million people — nearly 9 times the population of Alabama.

Arizona

  • There are 48 times more chickens than people in Arkansas.
  • The average Arizona factory-farm dairy has nearly 2,700 cows.
  • The more than 93,000 dairy cows on factory-farm dairies in Maricopa County, Arizona produce as much untreated manure as the sewage from the New York City metro area.
  • The 180,500 dairy cows, 366,600 beef cattle, 614,000 egg-laying hens, and 5,100 hogs on factory farms in Arizona produce as much untreated manure as 77 million people — 11 times the population of Arizona.

Arkansas

  • The Government Accountability Office reported that Benton and Washington counties in Arkansas produced 942 million pounds of manure in 2002.
  • The more than 16 million broiler chickens on factory farms in Benton County, Arkansas produce as much untreated manure as the sewage from the Atlanta metro area.
  • The more than 14 million broiler chickens on factory farms in Washington County, Arkansas produce as much untreated manure as the sewage from the Boston metro area.
  • The 133.8 million broiler chickens, 3.6 million egg-laying hens, 244,700 hogs, 3,800 beef cattle, and nearly 1,500 dairy cows on factory farms in Arkansas produce as much untreated manure as 51 million people — nearly 18 times the population of Arkansas.

More Arkansas facts

California

  • The average industrial feedlot in California had more than 18,700 beef cattle.
  • The nearly 240,000 dairy cows on factory-farm dairies in Merced County, California produce ten times more waste than the sewage from the Atlanta metro area.
  • The 155,000 dairy cows on factory-farmed dairies in Kings County, California produce twice as much untreated manure as the sewage from the New York City metro area.
  • The 399,000 beef cattle on industrial feedlots in Imperial County, California produce twice as much untreated manure as the sewage from the New York City metro area.

More California facts

Colorado

  • There is one factory farmed hog for every 5 people in Colorado.
  • There is one beef cattle on an industrial feedlot for every 5 people in Colorado.
  • The average Colorado hog factory farm has more than 30,800 hogs — about six times larger than the national average.
  • The more than 181,000 beef cattle on industrial feedlots in Yuma County, Colorado produce as much untreated manure as the sewage from the Los Angeles and Atlanta metro areas combined.

More Colorado facts

Delaware

  • There are 19 times more chickens on factory farms than people in Delaware.
  • The more than 14 million broiler chickens on factory farms in Sussex County, Delaware produce as much untreated manure as the sewage from the Boston metro area.

Florida

  • The size of average Florida egg factory farms nearly tripled to 1.6 million hens between 1997 and 2007.
  • In 2009, the EPA issued an administrative order against a Sarasota County dairy for improperly disposing of dead cows above ground. The dairy had been sued in 2003 for disposing of manure without a permit.

Georgia

  • There are 22 times more chickens on factory farms than people in Georgia.
  • The more than 10.7 million broiler chickens on factory farms in Gilmer County, Georgia produce as much untreated manure as the sewage from the Seattle metro area.
  • The more than 17.5 million broiler chickens on factory farms in Franklin County, Georgia produce as much untreated manure as the sewage from the Philadelphia metro area.
  • The nearly 205 million broiler chickens, 9 million egg-laying hens, 235,000 hogs, and 35,000 dairy cows on factory farms in Georgia produce as much untreated manure as 85 million people — nearly 9 times the population of Georgia.

Idaho

  • The average Idaho factory-farm dairy has more than 2,100 cows.
  • There is one factory farmed dairy cow for every three people in Idaho.
  • There is one beef cattle on an industrial feedlot for every 6 people in Idaho.
  • The more than 135,000 dairy cows on factory-farm dairies in Gooding County, Idaho produce as much untreated manure as the sewage output from the New York City and Chicago metro areas combined.

More Idaho facts

Illinois

  • There is one factory farmed hog for every three people in Illinois.
  • The number of factory farmed hogs in Illinois grew by 22 percent to 3.9 million between 1997 and 2007.
  • The size of average Illinois egg factory farms nearly doubled to nearly 821,000 million hens between 1997 and 2007.
  • In 2009, an Iroquois County hog operation manure spill tainted 19-miles of a local stream, killing fish for several days, including the native northern pike.

More Illinois facts

Indiana

  • There are 6 times as many hogs on factory farms as people in Iowa.
  • There are only twice as many people as factory farmed hogs in Indiana.
  • The number of factory farmed hogs in Indiana grew by 18 percent to 3.3 million between 1997 and 2007.
  • The more than 6 million egg-laying hens on factory farms in Adams County, Indiana produce as much untreated manure as the sewage from the San Diego metro area.

More Indiana facts

Iowa

  • There are 18 times more chickens on factory farms than people in Iowa.
  • The number of factory farmed hogs in Iowa grew 75 percent to 17.9 million between 1997 and 2007.
  • The size of average Iowa egg factory farms nearly tripled to nearly 1.3 million hens between 1997 and 2007.
  • In 2008, a leaky hose on a Blairstown, Iowa dairy allowed 5,000 gallons of manure to discharge to a local waterway.

More Iowa facts

Kansas

  • The average Kansas hog factory farm has 10,000 pigs.
  • The average Kansas factory-farm dairy has nearly 3,600 cows.
  • There are only twice as many people as factory farmed hogs in Kansas.
  • Kansas nearly has more beef cattle on industrial feedlots (2.6 million) than people (2.8 million).

More Kansas facts

Kentucky

  • There are 11 times more chickens on factory farms than people in Kentucky.
  • In 2003, a federal judge in Kentucky found that because Tyson Foods exercises so much control over its contract poultry growers, it too was responsible for the air pollution caused by these operations.

Louisiana

  • There are six times more chickens on factory farms than people in Louisiana.

Maine

  • In 2008, a 4-mile cow manure spill was left on a Maine state highway.

Maryland

  • There are six times more chickens on factory farms than people in Maryland.
  • Perdue’s poultry operations in the Chesapeake Bay produce so much more waste than the region can handle that the manure has to be trucked out of the state.
  • Livestock manure from the watersheds that feed the Chesapeake Bay are the source of about one-fourth of the pollution that causes oxygen-depleted dead zones in the Chesapeake.
  • In 2009, a 1,000-cow Frederick County, Maryland dairy operation reimbursed the county and a local city $254,900 for emergency water supplies, testing and other costs after a 576,000 gallon manure spill in 2008 polluted the town’s water supply, which had to be shut off for two months.

More Maryland facts

Michigan

  • The size of average Michigan egg factory farms nearly tripled to more than 875,000 hens between 1997 and 2007.
  • In 2009, as many as 200,000 fish were killed in a 12-mile length of the Black River in Sanilac County, Michigan after dairy manure was improperly spread on fields.
  • The more than 3.5 million egg-laying hens on factory farms in Allegan County, Michigan produce as much untreated manure as the sewage from the Austin, Texas metro area.
  • In 2007, the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality sued the 6,600-head Ingham County Vreba-Hoff Dairy for failing to comply with state water quality laws and violating a 2005 consent judgment.

More Michigan facts

Minnesota

  • There are 40% more factory farmed hogs (7.1 million) than people (5.3 million) in Minnesota.
  • The number of factory farmed hogs in Minnesota grew 70 percent to 7.1 million between 1997 and 2002.
  • The more than 679,000 hogs on factory farms in McLeod County, Minnesota produce twice as much untreated manure as the sewage from the Houston metro area.
  • The 7 million hogs, nearly 290,000 beef cattle, 91,000 dairy cows, 9 million egg-laying hens, and 3 million broiler chickens on factory farms in Minnesota produce as much untreated manure as 179 million people — more than half the U.S. population.

Mississippi

  • There are 38 times more chickens on factory farms than people in Mississippi.
  • The 110 million broiler chickens, 1.8 million egg-laying hens, 326,600 hogs and 3,500 dairy cows on factory farms in Mississippi produce as much untreated manure as 44 million people — 15 times the population of Mississippi.

Missouri

  • There are only twice as many people as factory farmed hogs in Missouri.
  • There are 8 times more chickens on factory farms than people in Missouri.
  • The size of average Missouri egg factory farms doubled to nearly 1.4 million hens between 1997 and 2007.
  • Premium Standard Farms industrial hog facilities were three of the top five sources of odor complaints in Missouri between 2002 and 2006.

More Missouri facts

Nebraska

  • There are 40% more cattle on feedlots (2.5 million) than people (1.8 million) in Nebraska.
  • There are 60% more factory farmed hogs (2.9 million) than people (1.8 million) in Nebraska.
  • The nearly 254,000 beef cattle on industrial feedlots in Cuming County, Nebraska produce as much untreated manure as the sewage from the New York City and Miami metro areas combined.
  • The more than 2.5 million beef cattle, 2.8 million hogs, 10 million egg-laying hens, nearly 26,700 dairy cows, and 168,000 broiler chickens on factory farms in Nebraska produce as much untreated manure as 313 million people — more than the entire U.S. population.

New Mexico

  • The average New Mexico factory-farm dairy has nearly 2,400 cows.
  • There is one factory farmed dairy cow for every six people in New Mexico.
  • Along Interstate 10 southeast of Las Cruces, New Mexico, there are 30,000 dairy cows on 11 back-to-back dairies.
  • The 85,000 dairy cows on factory-farm dairies in Chaves County, New Mexico produce as much untreated manure as the sewage output from the Los Angeles and Philadelphia metro areas combined.

More New Mexico facts

New York

  • The nearly 213,000 dairy cows on factory-farm dairies in New York produce as much untreated manure as 47 million people — two and a half times the population of New York.
  • In 2009, a dairy manure spill in upstate New York spilled into a tributary of the St. Lawrence River. Workers at a 6,000-head dairy spread manure to frozen fields, which pooled and leaked into the river.

North Carolina

  • There are nine times more chickens on factory farms than people in North Carolina.
  • There are more factory farmed hogs (10.1 million) than people (9.4 million) in North Carolina.
  • The more than 2.2 million hogs on factory farms in Duplin County, North Carolina produce twice as much untreated manure as the sewage from the New York City metro area.
  • The nearly 812,000 hogs on factory farms in Bladen County, North Carolina produce as much untreated manure as the sewage from the Chicago and Atlanta metro areas combined.

More North Carolina facts

North Dakota

  • There is one factory farmed hog for every four people in North Dakota.

Ohio

  • In 2009, a Fulton County dairy manure sprayer became stuck, dispersing manure that entered the Little Bear Creek.
  • In 2009, a line break on a Miami County hog farm spilled manure and affected 4.5 miles of the Canyon Run Creek and Stillwater River, killing 3,000 fish.
  • In 2008, the Ohio Department of Natural Resources investigated a manure spill that contaminated 2 miles of a tributary of the Middle Creek and caused a fish kill.
  • The nearly 4.5 million egg-laying hens on factory farms in Darke County, Ohio produce as much untreated manure as the sewage from the entire Cincinnati metro area.

More Ohio facts

Oklahoma

  • The average Oklahoma hog factory farm has 24,800 pigs.
  • The average Oklahoma factory-farm dairy has more than 2,400 cows.
  • The average industrial feedlot in Oklahoma has nearly 13,300 beef cattle.
  • There are seven times more chickens on factory farms than people in Oklahoma.

More Oklahoma facts

Oregon

  • In 2009, an Oregon feedlot agreed to pay an $8,000 penalty to settle discharge violations for allowing manure to flow into a Snake River tributary.
  • Threemile Canyon Farms in Boardman, Oregon, is the largest dairy operation in the state with tens of thousands cows, which release more than 15,000 pounds of ammonia into the air every single day.

Pennsylvania

  • The more than 3.7 million egg-laying hens on factory farms in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania produce as much untreated manure as the sewage from the Columbus, Ohio metro area.
  • The nearly 1 million hogs, 54,600 dairy cows, 25 million chickens and 35,000 beef cattle produce as much untreated manure as 43 million people — three and a half times the population of Pennsylvania.
  • In 2010, Fulton County dairy operators agreed to pay a $12,920 fine and shut down their farm after tens of thousands of gallons of manure spilled into a tributary of the Licking Creek and Potomac River and killed 650 fish.

South Carolina

  • There are 8 times more chickens on factory farms than people in South Carolina.

South Dakota

  • There are nearly two factory farmed hogs for every person in South Dakota.
  • There is one beef cattle on an industrial feedlot for every 2 people in South Dakota.
  • The 342,000 beef cattle, 1.4 million hogs, 45,000 dairy cows, and 2.8 million egg-laying hens on factory farms in South Dakota produce as much untreated manure as 69 million people — 85 times the population of South Dakota.

Texas

  • The average Texas hog factory farm has 100,000 hogs.
  • The average industrial feedlot in Texas has more than 20,500 beef cattle.
  • The nearly 14 million broiler chickens on factory farms in Nacogdoches County, Texas produce as much untreated manure as the sewage from the Detroit metro area.
  • The more than 20 million broiler chickens on factory farms in Shelby County, Texas produce as much untreated manure as the sewage from the Dallas-Fort Worth metro area.

More Texas facts

Utah

  • The average Utah hog factory farm has nearly 40,000 pigs.
  • There is one factory farmed hog for every four people in Utah.

Vermont

  • In 2008, the Vermont Agency of Natural Resources fined two northwestern Vermont farmers for excessive manure spreading on local field that ran off into Lake Champlain.

Virginia

  • In 2010, the EPA ordered a dairy and turkey farm from discharging nitrogen and phosphorus laden manure into a tributary of the Shenandoah River.
  • In 2010, the EPA ordered a 100,000 broiler chicken operation to stop discharging pollutants from large piles of uncovered chicken manure that were leaching nitrogen and phosphorus into a tributary of the Shenandoah River.
  • In 2010, the EPA ordered a 100,000 broiler chicken operation in Virginia to stop discharging pollutants from large piles of uncovered chicken manure that were leaching nitrogen and phosphorus into a tributary of the Shenandoah River.

Washington

  • The average industrial feedlot in Washington has more than 12,100 beef cattle.
  • In 2010, a manure lagoon on a 750-cow dairy collapsed, spilling 12 million gallons of manure onto fields that leaked into the Snohimish River.
  • The 86,000 dairy cows on factory-farm dairies in Yakima County, Washington produce as much untreated manure as the sewage output from the New York City metro area.
  • In 2008, a Mt. Vernon, Washington dairy agreed to pay an $8,000 penalty to settle alleged Clean Water Act violations for manure discharges that leaked from a barn into a tributary that leads to the Puget Sound.

More Washington facts

West Virginia

  • There are six times more chickens on factory farms than people in West Virginia.

Wisconsin

  • In 2008, a 600-heifer Rockland, Wisconsin farm was ordered to pay $28,000 for a manure discharge that killed 225 trout in a nearby creek and many more fish as far as 9 miles downstream.
  • Some Wisconsin mega-dairies have operated without necessary permits and many never receive an onsite inspection — the state’s goal is to visit once every 5 years but admits it does not meet that goal.
  • Between 2003 and the end of 2010, Wisconsin will have permitted 200 mega-dairies to open or expand but has never turned down a permit application or revoked a permit, even after repeated environmental violations.
  • The 257,000 dairy cows, nearly 270,000 hogs, 40,000 beef cattle, 4.9 million broiler chickens, and 3.6 million egg-laying hens on factory farms in Wisconsin produce as much untreated manure as 69 million people — 12 times the population of Wisconsin.

More Wisconsin facts

Wyoming

  • The average Wyoming hog factory farm has nearly 34,000 pigs.

Mother Jones: Are We Becoming China’s Factory Farm?US hog operations are feeding more than a billion people’s growing appetite for pork.


Mother Jones

Are We Becoming China’s Factory Farm?

US hog operations are feeding more than a billion people’s growing appetite for pork.

Social Title:
Are we becoming China’s factory farm?
pigs on conveyor belt

Illustration: Michael Klein

China is in the midst of a love affair with pork. Its consumption of the stuff has nearly doubled since 1993 and just keeps rising. The Chinese currently eat 88 pounds per capita each year—far more than Americans‘ relatively measly 60 pounds. To meet the growing demand, China’s hog farms have grown and multiplied, and more than half of the globe’s pigs are now raised there. But even so, its production can’t keep up with the pork craze.

So where is China looking to supply its demand for chops, ribs, loins, butts, and bellies? Not Southeast Asia or Africa—more like Iowa and North Carolina. US pork exports to China surged from about 57,000 metric tons in 2003 to more than 430,000 metric tons in 2012, about a fifth of all such exports. And that was before a Chinese company announced its intention to buy US pork giant Smithfield Foods in 2013. The way things are going, the United States is poised to become China’s very own factory hog farm. Here are a few reasons why:

➊ It’s now cheaper to produce pork in the US than in China. You read that right: Our meat industry churns out hogs for about $0.57 per pound, according to the US Department of Agriculture, versus $0.68 per pound in China’s new, factory-scale hog farms. The main difference is feed costs. US pig producers spend about 25 percent less on feed than their Chinese counterparts, the USDA found, because the „United States has more abundant land, water, and grain resources.“

âž‹Americans are not as fond of „the other white meat“ as we once were. You wouldn’t know it from the menus in trendy restaurants, but US consumers‘ appetite for pork hit a peak in 1999 and has declined ever since. Yet industry, beholden to shareholders demanding growth, keeps churning out more. According to its latest projections, the USDA expects US pork exports to rise by another 0.9 metric tons by 2022—a 33 percent jump from 2012 levels.

➌ Much of China’s arable land is polluted. Fully 40 percent has been degraded by erosion, salinization, or acidification—and nearly 20 percent is tainted by industrial effluent, sewage, excessive farm chemicals, or mining runoff. The pollution makes soil less productive, and dangerous elements like cadmium have turned up in rice crops.

➍ Chinese rivers have been vanishing since the 1990s as demand from farms and factories has helped suck them dry. Of the ones that remain, 75 percent are severely polluted, and more than a third of those are so toxic they can’t be used to irrigate farms, according to a 2008 report by the Chinese government. According to the World Bank, China’s average annual water resources are less than 2,200 cubic meters per capita. The United States, by contrast, boasts almost 9,400 cubic meters of water per person.

➎ Chinese consumers are losing trust in the nation’s food supply—and will pay for alternatives. A spate of food-related scandals over the past half decade has made food safety the Chinese public’s No. 1 concern, a 2013 study from Shanghai Jiao Tong University found. Judith Shapiro, author of the 2012 book China’s Environmental Challenges and director of the Natural Resources and Sustainable Development program at American University, says she expects Smithfield pork to command „quite a premium“ in China, because it’s perceived as safer and better than the domestic stuff. Already, „US pork is particularly popular and commands premium prices, as it is viewed as higher quality due to our strict food safety laws,“ a Bloomberg Businessweek columnist reported last July.

But what’s good for pork exporters may not be good for the United States: More mass-produced pork also means more pollution to air and water from toxic manure, more dangerous and low-wage work, and more antibiotic-resistant pathogens. And that’s just the beginning. In addition to ramping up foreign meat purchases, China is also rapidly transforming its domestic meat industry along the US industrial model—and importing enormous amounts of feed to do so. The Chinese and their hogs, chickens, and cows gobble up a jaw-dropping 60 percent of the global trade in soybeans, and the government may soon also ramp up corn imports—because while Beijing currently limits foreign corn purchases, meat producers are clamoring for more. And where does a third of the globe’s corn come from? You guessed it: The good old USA.

On each day of October 2013 an average of 336.129 pigs were slaughtered – 4 per second)


Brutality to animals is cruelty to mankind – it is only the difference in the victim.“

– Alphonse de Lamartine, 1847

On November 21, 2013, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) released these data.

On each day of October, 2013, an average of: 336,129 pigs were slaughtered (4 per second)

93,548 cows were slaughtered (1 per second)

6,712 sheep were slaughtered (one every 12 seconds)

2,241 calves were slaughtered (one every 30 seconds)

TOTAL: This averages out to 307 brutal killings for every minute of every hour of every day

during October of 2013.

Imagine three things.

1) The never-ending assembly line

s 2) Each animal dies by partial beheading with a sharp knife while still alive

3) The volume of blood

„I like children they are tasty .“ –

Albert Fish Final words before his January 16, 1936 execution.

Fish was a serial killer who was believed to have consumed children in every state.

He was also known as The Brooklyn Vampire, the Werewolf of Wysteria the Moon Maniac,

and the Boogeyman.

Robert Cohen http://www.notmilk.com   cover1schweingehabt My book with a huge number of informations:

Schwein gehabt? – Gewalt auf unseren Tellern (Kindle  Edition) http://www.amazon.de/dp/B00BBDUBMC/ref=rdr_kindle_ext_tmb#_

Pigs Hogging Headlines


41ZpbCRQlrL__BO2,204,203,200_PIsitb-sticker-arrow-click,TopRight,35,-76_AA278_PIkin4,BottomRight,-58,22_AA300_SH20_OU03_

Homeland Security Pigs Hogging Headlines by Casting
Pearls Before Michigan Law Swine is a Major Boar

„I am concerned for the security of our great Nation;
not so much because of any threat from without, but
because of the insidious forces working from within.“
Douglas MacArthur

A dairy farmer milking 2,500 cows in the Michigan
dell did not learn his lesson first time around.

The second time, his farm was raided by federal
agents using helicopters.

His crime? Hiring illegal aliens who shoveled
cow dung from barns into once-clean waterways.

Aquilla Farms was fined $2.7 million. Homeland Security,
which make some (not all) Americans free from Mexicanos
has just awarded $500,000 to two Michigan police agencies
which participated in the recent raid. The entire portion
of that fine should have gone into the general treasury.
Since when does Homeland Security have the right to award
fines as they see fit?

If Homeland Security would only do this all over America,
we would be blessed. Americans would no longer find
freshly picked produce, because there would be no migrant
workers left to pick apples, oranges, or rutabaga.

Consider how safe you now feel from potential South
of the Border terroristas who might prevent trusting
Americans from overdosing on guacamole.

Admit it. Are you not proud to be an American?

The funds were presented in early March, 2013.

Perhaps government funding should also be shared
with police who issue speeding tickets. I can see
the future posters: Wanted, Dead or Alive: Dangerous
alien Jaywalkers. Large cash award. No questions
asked.

Oink.

„An ungrateful man is like a hog under a tree
eating acorns, but never looking up to see where
they come from.“
– Timothy Dexter

Robert Cohen
http://www.notmilk.com

Tote Schweine im Shanghai River


huangpu river in shanghai, china
huangpu river in shanghai, china (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

http://spon.de/vfrJa Video
URL:
http://www.spiegel.de/panorama/china-tote-schweine-im-shanghai-river-a-887910.html

SPIEGEL ONLINE

10. März 2013, 11:21 Uhr

China

Rätsel um Hunderte tote Schweine in Shanghais Stadtfluss

Peking – Im Stadtfluss Huangpu der chinesischen 23-Millionen-Einwohner-Metropole Shanghai sind seit Donnerstag (Ortszeit) die Kadaver von 900 toten Schweinen gefunden worden. Behördenvertreter untersuchen, woher die Schweine stammen. Aus dem Huangpu speist sich ein Teil des Trinkwasserbedarfs Shanghais.

In einer Mitteilung auf der Internetseite des Shanghaier Komitees für Landwirtschaft hieß es, die Verwaltung habe keine Belege gefunden, dass die Schweine absichtlich in den Fluss geworfen worden seien. Es gebe auch keine Hinweise für Tierseuchen. Die Behörden würden die Trinkwasserkontrollen verstärken, hieß es in der Mitteilung.

dba/AP
URL:
http://www.spiegel.de/panorama/china-tote-schweine-im-shanghai-river-a-887910.html

Burning Transport Truck Full of Animals in Germany


Burning transport truck full of animals in Germany

Posted on 25/01/2013 by asansolini

Tiertransporter brennt – 45 Jungschweine sterbendpa,23.01.2013 08:54 Uhr
Auf der A3 ist ein Lkw mit einer Ladung lebender Schweine in Brand geraten. 45 Tiere kamen dabei ums Leben. Die Bilder vom Unfall... Foto: Polizei
Auf der A3 ist ein Lkw mit einer Ladung lebender Schweine in Brand geraten. 45 Tiere kamen dabei ums Leben. Die Bilder vom Unfall…Foto: Polizei
Tragischer Tod auf der A 3: Von den 460 transportierten Jungtieren sterben 45 – entweder in den Flammen oder weil sie erschossen werden müssen.
Neumarkt/Regensburg – Beim Brand eines Tiertransporters auf der Autobahn 3 sind bei Neumarkt in der Oberpfalz 45 Schweine getötet worden.
Der Sattelzug war am Dienstagabend mit etwa 460 Jungtieren beladen in Richtung Süden unterwegs, als der Fahrer das Feuer bemerkte. Wie die Polizei Regensburg mitteilte, brannte die Zugmaschine aus. Dabei entstand ein Loch, durch das 75 Schweine auf die Autobahn gelangten.
45 Tiere starben in den Flammen oder wurden von einem Tierarzt und Streifenpolizisten erschossen. Die Feuerwehr fing die übrigen Schweine ein.
Die A3 wurde für etwa eine Stunde komplett gesperrt, Brandursache war vermutlich ein Defekt.
 

WHO gave these workers the right to act in such way? Poor Animals…


http://youtu.be/tzrRmB40l00  

From Farm To Fridge „La vérité derrière la production de viande“

The utmost graphic video! 

 

 

Cheap Meat costs a Lot


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4R0VqJT9r8E

Pigs …