Pigs` Hidden Life In CAFOs – Hidden From Public´s Eyes: Here You´ll Learn more about these smart animals pigs are!

Letztes

When it comes to animal cuteness, we always refer to cats and dogs, but what about pigs? — boldcorsicanflame’s Blog


When it comes to animal cuteness, we always refer to cats and dogs who usually win the golden medal of the cutests animals on the internet, but what about pigs? Those little creatures are often forgotten, yet there are as cute as cats or dogs, sometimes even more!

via When it comes to animal cuteness, we always refer to cats and dogs, but what about pigs? — boldcorsicanflame’s Blog

Bild

Nelsontroche JR Troche „You abused Animals!“


LONG DISTANT TRANSPORT OF CALVES (UK TO SPAIN)


FARMAGGEDON – THE TRUE COST OF CHEAP MEAT


How Calgary reduced dog attacks without banning pit bulls


The solution to reducing aggressive canine behaviour is to change the behaviour of their owners, Calgary expert Bill Bruce says. The city has some of the strictest animal regulations in North America.

The solution to reducing aggressive canine behaviour is to change the behaviour of their owners, Calgary expert Bill Bruce says. The city has some of the strictest animal regulations in North America. Postmedia News files

How Calgary reduced dog attacks without banning pit bulls

While Montreal has decided to tackle the issue of savage dog attacks by banning pit bull type dogs, Calgary is standing by its long-held decision to put the responsibility on the other end of the leash.

“I don’t support breed bans because they don’t work,” said Bill Bruce, the former director of animal services for the city of Calgary, whose animal-control program is considered among the most effective in North America. “We have to get to the root of the problem, and that is that people must maintain control of their animals.”

Forcing responsibility onto owners, educating the public on the importance of quickly dealing with problem dogs and ensuring pets are licensed led to a precipitous drop in the number of aggressive incidents. It’s not a quick process, officials say, but it works in the long run and avoids wrenching and expensive acrimony. The system is supported by Montreal animal shelters.

“When you misidentify the issue as breed specific, when you say all of a particular breed are bad dogs, you have now polarized your community,” said Bruce, who retired as director in 2012, after 12 years in the post. “So everybody who has a dog like that and knows it is a good dog, is your mortal enemy, as well as everyone who knows that dog and knows it’s a good dog, and you’re going to spend a fortune in court as a municipality.

“The thing that disturbs me the most,” Bruce said over the phone from Calgary, “is that in every city I’ve looked at (that has introduced a breed ban), they have not reduced the overall number of bites in the community.”

The city of Montreal announced last week it would be banning the future acquisition of pit-bull type dogs, mixed breeds with pit-bulls in their lineage and dogs that resemble them, in the hopes of warding off the type of attacks that led to the death of 55-year-old Pointe-aux-Trembles resident Christiane Vadnais in June. Under Montreal’s proposed new animal control bylaws, current owners can keep their pit-bull type dogs under strict regulations. Montreal is joining numerous municipalities as well as the province of Ontario, which instituted a pit-bull ban in 2005, who argue that pit-bull type dogs must be gradually removed from society because they are responsible for an inordinate number of serious attacks.

Calgary has been testing the theory since 2000, at a time when Labrador retrievers were the breed most likely to inflict bites. The city of 1.2 million people decided to shift from the standard “animal control” model to a “responsible pet owner” model.

Bruce, the son of a police officer who grew up with German shepherds in his house, was the new director of animal services at the time. On visits to the city’s shelters, he found most often animals were abandoned because of a failure in the relationship with their human owners, often linked to a behavioural issue, be it too much barking or allergies or nipping at strangers. Bruce would see the owners sitting in their car in the shelter parking lot, “crying for half an hour.”

The solution to reducing aggressive canine behaviour, city officials decided, was to approach owners while issues were still relatively minor and give them the tools to fix the problem.

Problem dogs are aggressive for one of two reasons, Bruce said. Some owners choose intimidating breeds because the dog gives them a sense of increasing their own power. Those are not good dog owners, he said, and often must be separated from their pets, and fined strictly if the dogs are aggressive. Ban a breed and that type of owner will gravitate to the newest trend in intimidating or demonized dogs — in the 1960s, it was German shepherds, in the ’70s it was Dobermans, followed by Rottweilers and then pit bulls. The latest move is toward larger breeds like bullmastiffs and Cane Corsos.

Banning pit bulls is not a solution, advises Bill Bruce, former director of animal services for the city of Calgary. "When you misidentify the issue as breed specific, when you say all of a particular breed are bad dogs, you have now polarized your community."
Banning pit bulls is not a solution, advises Bill Bruce, former director of animal services for the city of Calgary. “When you misidentify the issue as breed specific, when you say all of a particular breed are bad dogs, you have now polarized your community.” Dario Ayala / Montreal Gazette

 

MEDIA RELEASES: Authorities Investigating After Witness Documents Blood Streaming from Cow Transport Truck September 1, 2016


 

CAMBRIDGE, ON—The Canadian Food Inspection Agency is investigating after a witness saw blood streaming from and caked onto the side of a transport truck at a rest station. Video footage shot at the scene shows a cow with a gaping, bleeding wound aboard the truck, which had Manitoba plates.

Witness Amber Gionet said: “I couldn’t believe how much blood I saw all over the truck, with even more blood coming out of a cow’s open wound. It was heartbreaking to see these gentle and curious animals in such an ugly situation. They deserve so much better than to be injured and forgotten on a transport truck in the middle of the night.”

Ontario law prohibits animal cruelty, and specifically requires animals be transported in a way that ensures their physical safety and welfare. Federal law prohibits over-crowding animals or transporting injured animals, and requires trucks to be free from protrusions or other construction flaws that injure animals.

Veterinarian Maureen Harper reviewed the video footage and said: “This wound appears to be quite severe and the animal would be suffering. Possible causes of the wound are overcrowding, or sharp protrusions or fittings on the vehicle; or it could have been an older wound that was re-opened in transit. This incident needs to be investigated.”

The witnessed reported the incident to the Ontario SPCA which declined to open an investigation, instead instructing the witness to call the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs (OMAFRA). OMAFRA in turn instructed the witness to call the Canadian Food Inspection Agency.cruelty slips through the cracks. We see far too much farmed animal suffering chalked up to business as usual, while law enforcement plays hot potato with animal cruelty reports.”Animal transport laws are under scrutiny right now as an Ontario woman stands trial for giving water to heat-stressed pigs aboard a transport truck—she has been charged with criminal mischief for interfering with the farmer’s property, his pig. Canadian transport laws are decades old and have been widely criticized for being the worst in the Western world. Drivers aren’t required to have any animal welfare training or licensing.

Lawyer Anna Pippus, director of farmed animal advocacy for Animal Justice, said: “Canadian animal welfare laws are notoriously weak and under-enforced. This is a case-in-point of how egregious animal 

For more information, please contact:
Anna Pippus
Director of Farmed Animal Advocacy
apippus@animaljustice.ca

CAMBRIDGE, ON—The Canadian Food Inspection Agency is investigating after a witness saw blood streaming from and caked onto the side of a transport truck at a rest station. Video footage shot at the scene shows a cow with a gaping, bleeding wound aboard the truck, which had Manitoba plates.

Witness Amber Gionet said: “I couldn’t believe how much blood I saw all over the truck, with even more blood coming out of a cow’s open wound. It was heartbreaking to see these gentle and curious animals in such an ugly situation. They deserve so much better than to be injured and forgotten on a transport truck in the middle of the night.”

Ontario law prohibits animal cruelty, and specifically requires animals be transported in a way that ensures their physical safety and welfare. Federal law prohibits over-crowding animals or transporting injured animals, and requires trucks to be free from protrusions or other construction flaws that injure animals.

Veterinarian Maureen Harper reviewed the video footage and said: “This wound appears to be quite severe and the animal would be suffering. Possible causes of the wound are overcrowding, or sharp protrusions or fittings on the vehicle; or it could have been an older wound that was re-opened in transit. This incident needs to be investigated.”

The witnessed reported the incident to the Ontario SPCA which declined to open an investigation, instead instructing the witness to call the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs (OMAFRA). OMAFRA in turn instructed the witness to call the Canadian Food Inspection Agency.

Lawyer Anna Pippus, director of farmed animal advocacy for Animal Justice, said: “Canadian animal welfare laws are notoriously weak and under-enforced. This is a case-in-point of how egregious animal cruelty slips through the cracks. We see far too much farmed animal suffering chalked up to business as usual, while law enforcement plays hot potato with animal cruelty reports.”

Animal transport laws are under scrutiny right now as an Ontario woman stands trial for giving water to heat-stressed pigs aboard a transport truck—she has been charged with criminal mischief for interfering with the farmer’s property, his pig. Canadian transport laws are decades old and have been widely criticized for being the worst in the Western world. Drivers aren’t required to have any animal welfare training or licensing

For more information, please contact:
Anna Pippus
Director of Farmed Animal Advocacy
apippus@animaljustice.ca

Mehr als 200 Ferkel bei Feuer in Niedersachsen verendet VORPROGRAMMIERTE TIERQUAL! KEINERLEI VORSORGE FÜR SOLCHE FÄLLE! ICH HABE DARÜBER IN SCHWEIN GEHABT GESCHRIEBEN!


Stall bei Nienburg niedergebrannt: In der Nähe von Nienburg ist ein Stall in Flammen aufgegangen, bei dem Brand verendeten rund 220 Ferkel. Das Gebäude brannte bis auf die Grundmauern nieder.© Bereitgestellt von AFP In der Nähe von Nienburg ist ein Stall in Flammen aufgegangen, bei dem Brand verendeten rund 220 Ferkel. Das Gebäude brannte bis auf die Grundmauern nieder.

Bei einem Brand in einem Stall in der niedersächsischen Gemeinde Warmsen sind rund 220 Ferkel verendet. Eine Polizeistreife hatte am Mittwochnachmittag starken Rauch bemerkt und sofort die Feuerwehr alarmiert, wie die Polizei am Donnerstag in Nienburg mitteilte. Der Stall brannte trotzdem bis auf die Grundmauern nieder. Der Sachschaden wird auf ungefähr 350.000 Euro geschätzt.

Die Brandursache war zunächst unklar. Die Polizei nahm Ermittlungen auf. Insgesamt waren mehr als 200 Feuerwehrleute im Einsatz. Ein Übergreifen des Feuers auf das direkt angrenzende Wohnhaus konnte verhindert werden. … https://www.msn.com/de-de/nachrichten/panorama/mehr-als-200-ferkel-bei-feuer-in-niedersachsen-verendet/ar-AAim1ov?li=BBqg6Q9

%d Bloggern gefällt das: